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Mallory Knox

Mallory Knox
Artwork

Mallory Knox just released their self-titled album and their first without former vocalist Mikey Chapman. Taking over vocals for Chapman is Sam Douglas, the band’s bassist. This is also the band’s first record away from Sony Records that they’ve done too, so there is a lot of differences between this record and the 2017 release of Wired.

Immediately, this record sounds different than the band’s past couple of records. There’s a much more organic feel to this record than there was to Wired. Guitars, vocals, and drums sound different, not just because it’s a different singer or because they’re playing has changed over the past couple of years, but because there’s a more traditional approach to this record. It’s not overproduced and overmixed, it’s a very upfront sound. It doesn’t work everywhere across the record, but on songs like “White Lies” it’s amazing.
Mallory Knox has had elements of punk, but here it’s a different era of punk. Instead of pop punk, this is like original Brit punk inspired. Think of something that’s closer to the Sex Pistols or The Clash. It’s a sound that suits them well and it’s a sound that fits Sam Douglas’ voice far better than what the band did on Wired.

Mikey Chapman was always going to be missed by Mallory Knox. He was the voice of the band for years and he’s an original talent, but Douglas holds his own here. Yeah, this record is about what’s going on behind him more than his voice, but that’s okay. Everything in music is so vocal driven now, we don’t get a lot of stuff where the guitarist is just as important as the vocalist to the band’s fans. That’s what we get with this Mallory Knox record. It’s not perfect. There are some monotonous moments on this record, and sometimes that upfront/organic approach goes a little too far in that direction, but overall the album is still solid.






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Mallory Knox
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Mallory Knox
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Mallory Knox just released their self-titled album and their first without former vocalist Mikey Chapman. Taking over vocals for Chapman is Sam Douglas, the band’s bassist. This is also the band’s first record away from Sony Records that they’ve done too, so there is a lot of differences between this record and the 2017 release of Wired.

Immediately, this record sounds different than the band’s past couple of records. There’s a much more organic feel to this record than there was to Wired. Guitars, vocals, and drums sound different, not just because it’s a different singer or because they’re playing has changed over the past couple of years, but because there’s a more traditional approach to this record. It’s not overproduced and overmixed, it’s a very upfront sound. It doesn’t work everywhere across the record, but on songs like “White Lies” it’s amazing.
Mallory Knox has had elements of punk, but here it’s a different era of punk. Instead of pop punk, this is like original Brit punk inspired. Think of something that’s closer to the Sex Pistols or The Clash. It’s a sound that suits them well and it’s a sound that fits Sam Douglas’ voice far better than what the band did on Wired.

Mikey Chapman was always going to be missed by Mallory Knox. He was the voice of the band for years and he’s an original talent, but Douglas holds his own here. Yeah, this record is about what’s going on behind him more than his voice, but that’s okay. Everything in music is so vocal driven now, we don’t get a lot of stuff where the guitarist is just as important as the vocalist to the band’s fans. That’s what we get with this Mallory Knox record. It’s not perfect. There are some monotonous moments on this record, and sometimes that upfront/organic approach goes a little too far in that direction, but overall the album is still solid.







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